Bush Beans:

(1) Tendergreen Improved (Originally Certified Organic)

(2) Black Valentine

(3) Blue Lake (Bush)

(4) Provider

(5) Royal Burgundy

(6) Red Mexican

(7) Derby

(8) Beurre de Roquencourt yellow wax bean

(9) Dragon's Tongue (Dutch wax bean)

 (10) Snow Cap

 (11) Jacob's Cattle

 (12) Saint-Esprit A Oeil Rouge

 (13) Tiger's Eye

 (14) Black Calypso

 (15) Red Calypso

 (16) Landreth's Stringless

 (17) Whipple

 (18) Trout

 (19) Appaloosa

 (20) Cranberry

 (21) Steuben Yellow Eye

 (22) Tongue of Fire

 (23) Mayacoba Canario

 (24) Zuni Shalako/Prairie Appaloosa

 (25) Painted Pony

 (26) Dapple Gray

 (27) Jacob’s Gold

 (28) Rockwell

 (29) Ireland Creek Annie

 (30) Lina Cisco’s Bird Egg

 (31) Flageolet Vert

 (32) Blue Jay

 (33) Candy

 

Pole/Runner Beans:

 (A) Painted Lady

(B) Scarlet Runner

 (C) Blue Lake (Pole)

 (D) Rattlesnake

 (E) Gold Marie Vining

 (F) Scarlet Emperor

 (G) Painted Lady Improved

 (H) Sunset Runner

 (I) Eye of the Goat/Ojo de Cabra

 (J) Aztec Cave Bean/New Mexico Cave Bean

 (K) Kentucky Wonder (Pole)

 (L) Purple Peacock

 (M) Cherokee Trail of Tears

 (N) Fortex

 

Notes:

All except (7) and (N) are heirloom varieties and/or sold by heirloom seed companies.

·         (1) - (5), and (A) - (C) were purchased from heirloomseeds.com in 2010.

·         (1) was purchased again at Wal-Mart in 2013

·         (C) was purchased again from Southern States in 2013 as a USDA Organic.

·         (6) purchased from reimerseeds.com in 2011

·         (7) purchased in a store in 2010 and sold by Ferry Morse

·         (8) purchased in a store in 2009 or 2010 and sold by Seeds of Change; Certified Organic

·         (9) purchased some time in 2010 or prior, from a store

·         (10) - (12),(D), and (E) were purchased from Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds in 2013. 

·         (13) & (14) were purchased from Southern States in 2013 as a USDA Organic.

·         (F) was purchased from Southern States in 2013

·         (G), (K), and (M) were purchased from Seed Savers Exchange (through Amazon) in 2013

·         (15) - (22) were purchased from Victory Seed Company in 2013 

·         (23) - (26), (B)(again), (H), (I), and (J) were purchased from Azure Dandelion in 2013

·         (27) – (31) were purchased from Uprising Seeds in 2013

·         (32) and (33) were purchased from Russ Crow in 2013

·         (32) (again) and (L) were purchased from Laurel Ronan on esty.com

·         (N) was purchased from Natural Gardening Company in 2013

1-5 and 7 were first planted in 2010.  6, 8, A, and B were first planted in 2011.  First planting of 9 is unknown.  10-33 and C-K were first planted in 2013. 

All remaining longstanding generation beans (i.e. 11th or 12th generation beans, grown by me for many years) appear to be tendergreen or tendergreen improved.

(4) (Provider) and (6) (Red Mexican) look similar, except that (4) tends to be longer and darker, while (6) tends to be flatter and looks more like a black-eyed pea.

(5) pods are purple when raw, but turn green when cooked.

(9) is flatter and wider than normal kidney beans.  The flat pods have purple stripes on them that disappear when cooked.

(32) is similar in appearance to Tendergeen Improved (1), only dark colors are more bluish/purplish. 

(E) Gold Marie Vining is flatter than (3) Blue Lake or (7) Derby.

(A) and (B) are much larger than bush beans.

(C) is indistinguishable from (3).

(13) Germinated in just 5 days.

(E) sends up runners very quickly.

(F) Appears to be just another variety of (B).

(G) Appears to be another variety of (A).

Pole and bush beans (i.e. Non-“runner” beans), are Phaseolus vulgaris.  Runner beans are Phaseolus coccineus.  P. coccineus differs from the common bean (P. vulgaris) in several respects: the cotyledons stay in the ground during germination, and the plant is a perennial vine with tuberous roots (though it is usually treated as an annual).  This species originated from the mountains of Central America.  Most varieties have red flowers and multicolored seeds (though some have white flowers and white seeds), and they are often grown as ornamental plants.

 


 

Details - Bush Beans

(1) Tendergreen Improved (Originally Certified Organic)

--TENDERGREEN IMPROVED   53 days - "All American Selection" winner in 1933.  The strong, upright plants grow 16 to 20 inches high, and produce an abundant crop of 5 to 7 inch, straight, green, meaty pods.   An excellent bean for fresh use or for canning!

--50 days — 'Tendergreen' is an old multipurpose variety that was introduced by Peter Henderson & Co. in 1922.  It was an "All-America Selection®" winner in 1933.  The plants are strong and erect and reach about twenty inches in height. The pods are round, meaty and stringless.

Some current seed sellers are incorrectly attributing this variety to bean breeder and
Seedsman Hall of Famer, Calvin N. Keeney.  Although it can be said that the early work of Mr. Keeney can be found in the pedigrees of most modern stringless beans, the historical record does not actually support that he was actively part of Tendergreen's introduction.  Actually, in the 1931 bean variety description bible, "Beans of New York," U. P. Hedrick noted about Tendergreen, "The parentage is unknown as indicated in a letter from the concern (Peter Henderson) written in 1929."

--This very early heirloom bean is sure to make you smile!!  Tendergreen Bean was introduced by Henderson Seed Company in 1922. The almost round, dark green stringless pods grow on strong erect bush type plants that are typically 22" tall.  Tendergreen produces five to six inch long pods that contain uniquely colored seeds.  The seeds of Tendergreen are shades of tan with deep dark purple splashes.  These colorful beans can be left to fully dry and shelled for use as a pretty dry bean.  Tendergreen Bean's meaty pods and pretty beans give them a hearty flavor.  Very quick bean - 50 days until harvest.

(2) Black Valentine

This old heirloom dual purpose bean was first introduced in the late 1800's.  Black Valentine Bean has 6 inch long stringless beans grow on sturdy bush type plants.  The dark green pods of Black Valentine Bean should be picked before the black seeds inside fully develop if using as a green snap bean.  The flavor of the green beans is excellent and who doesn't like the fact that they are stringless.  Black Valentine Bean grows well in a variety of climates and is a good producer even in cooler temperatures.  Black Valentine can be left to fully dry and shelled for use as one of the prettiest black - purple beans you would ever want to see.  The bean is very shiny, unlike most shiny beans, Black Valentine cooks up quick without much soaking.  Very quick green snap bean - 50 days until harvest. Dry beans in about 70 days.

(3) Blue Lake (Bush)

--This heirloom bean is a bush type plant that bears heavy yields of dark green, round pods that measure up to six inches long.  It produces big yields of 6" pods that are straight, round, meaty and stingless. Blue Lake Bush Beans are tender and crisp with a good wholesome flavor.  Blue Lake Bush Bean plants produce longer than most.  Blue Lake Bush Bean are quick growing, just 58 Days until harvest.

--58 days — The pods develop to 5˝ to 6˝ inches in length.  This is a canner's favorite as the variety tends to mature its heavy crop all at once. A bush version of the popular climbing Blue Lake green beans.  Developed in 1961 from the Pole Blue Lake.

Does well even in adverse weather.

(4) Provider

53 days - First introduced in South Carolina during 1965.  [Introduced by Dr. Hoffman of South Carolina in 1965.] A very heavy yielder of straight, green, 5 to 6 inch, round beans.  Excellent quality bean for either fresh use or canning.  Takes the heat and keeps on producing!

(5) Royal Burgundy

60 days — The plants are erect and reach about eighteen inches in height and do well in cooler weather. The Round, stringless, purple five to six inch long pods that turn dark green when cooked. Great for freezing, canning or fresh eating. Released about 1976.

(6) Red Mexican

--85 days. Phaseolus vulgaris. Bush type plant produces good yields of beans. Beans do not become soggy or fall apart when baked. Excellent for soups. An 1855 heirloom variety from California. Plant Height: 14" tall.

--95 days.  Also known as ‘Montezuma Red'. Bushes tend to sprawl a bit, reach about fourteen inches, and produce small to medium sized, flattened dark red beans.  Very productive.  An heirloom popular in California since the mid-1800's but fairly rare now. Keeps shape well when baked.

(7) Derby

1990 All-America Selections Winner! 53 days. Phaseolus vulgaris. Bush type plant produces good yields of 6" long green beans all season long. Beans are very long and straight and stringless. Best if beans are picked when 5" long. Good freezing and canning variety. Disease Resistant.

(8) Beurre de Roquencourt yellow wax bean

A productive heirloom wax bean named for Rocquencourt, France, a town in France's rich farming country. Wax beans were introduced to France in the 1840's from Algeria, and this variety is surely a descendent of those early beans. The bush plants set good yields early, and produce well in most climates. The beans are favored by cooks for their fine-flavored pods that are a bright waxy-yellow in color. This variety was listed in Mother Earth News as a favorite of well-known writer William Woys Weaver.  Stringless.

(9) Dragon's Tongue (Dutch wax bean)

This famous Dutch heirloom bean has an incomparable flavor. The tender and superbly delicious 7-inch pods are yellow, with amazing purple streaks! Also makes a tasty shelled bean. Popular with chefs and gourmets. Compact plants set high yields.  Stringless.

(10) Snow Cap

75 days, Half-runner. This very large, beautiful bean has a distinctive white half or cap, the other half being beige with barn-red and brown markings which it retains when cooked. Mild, earthy flavor complements the silky smooth texture.

(11) Jacob's Cattle

--90 days — There are conflicting stories regarding the origin of this bean. One legend is that they were originally cultivated by the Passamaquoddy Indians in Maine. Another is that New Englanders named the bean from the Bible story of Jacob and the spotted cattle. By any account, they are certainly an heirloom and date back to at least the 1700s.

-- This heirloom is a dry shell variety that can also be used as a snap bean, just pick it early, when the pods start to plump, as you would any snap bean.  Jacob's Cattle Bean has a distinctively sweet, hearty flavor.  The bush type plants are very productive.  For dry beans, pods of Jacob's Cattle Bean are ready to pick when they are mature and dried down.  This Bean is NOT Aztec Cave / Anasazi Bean.  Anasazi Bean has splashes, not splashes and small spots.  The flavor is also different, more creamy, less hearty.  Anasazi is also a pole bean.

--An old-time bean from the New England states, the white and maroon mottled beans have long been a staple for baking and soups. This early bush variety is also good as a snap bean.

(12) Saint-Esprit A Oeil Rouge

This unique dry bean name "Holy Spirit in Red Eye" is due to its unique markings near the bean's eye that resemble an angel, dove, soldier or nun, depending on a gardener's point-of-view. Also called "Soldier Bean", a once popular type in the Southern U.S.A. It is an excellent soup and baking bean that is produced on bush plants. This type of bean was known by many names, like "Beans of the Religious" and "Navel of Good Sister."

(13) Tiger’s Eye

(Pepa da Zapallo Bush) 55-95 days. Striking colors make this dried bean an intriguing variety. Its versatility and superiority in the kitchen make it a gardeners’ “must-have”. This productive bean produces well in a broad range of conditions. It can be harvested as a snap bean before the seeds swell, as a shell bean or, dry and produce gold and maroon beans. The dried beans are prized for their creamy texture and skins that dissolve with cooking.

Days to harvest: snap: 55; shelling: 65-75; dried: 85-95. [In 2013, germinated in just 5 days.]

Tiger’s Eye beans are ready to pick when the pod “snaps” or breaks in half cleanly. This is when seeds have just begun to form and the pods are 4" long. Hold stem with one hand, and the pod with the other hand to avoid pulling off branches which may continue to produce. Shell beans are harvested when the seeds are well formed but the pods are still green. Pick pods as you would for snap beans, then split along the seam and remove seeds. Dry beans are left on the plant until the pod and beans inside are completely dry. If short seasons prevent drying plants in the ground before frost, pull entire plant with mature pods before frost and hang in a warm, dry place until pods are brittle; break open pods and remove seeds.

---tend to be a little viney

(14) Black Calypso

70 to 90 days — Also known as 'Yin-Yang' or 'Orca'.  They have a nice texture and used as a baking bean.  The plants reach fifteen inches and are strong.  The pods contain four to five seeds which are white and black with black dots in the white part of the seed.

Harvest young as a snap bean and after about 90 days for dry use. Nearly identical to 'Red Calypso' except for the seed coat color.

---tend to be a little viney

(15) Red Calypso

70 to 90 days — Nice texture and used as a baking bean. The plants reach fifteen inches with short runners but are strong. The pods contain four to five seeds which are maroonish-red and white with maroonish-red dots in the white part of the seed.

Harvest young as a snap bean and after about 90 days for dry use. Similar in markings to 'Beautiful' beans but smaller and nearly identical to 'Black Calypso' beans.

---tend to be a little viney

(16) Landreth's Stringless

55 days — This very old variety was released in 1885 by the Landreth Seed Company. The pods are green, round in cross-section, about five inches long, slightly curved, meaty and tasty, tender and nearly fiberless borne on twenty inch, erect plants. Each packet contains one ounce, which is approximately 65 seeds.

Although the name of this variety contains a modern company's name, the seed we are offering is in no way sourced from, "owned by" or connected with that company. The name is simply the historically accurate, common name for the variety giving credit to the seedsman that originally released it.

(17) Whipple

70 days — Although its exact history is lost to time, this old family heirloom is named after the pioneering family who settled in Oregon's Willamette Valley in the mid-19th century and who raised this bean.  Outside the local area, it has remained relatively unknown.

It is a dry bean and has an excellent, very rich, cooking flavor.  The seeds are a pretty purplish-red with little white spots.  Very rare and in limited supply.

---tend to be a little viney

(18) Trout

90 days — Many sources list the bean varieties 'Trout' and 'Jacobs Cattle Beans' as synonyms. Others state that 'Anasazi®' are also the same. They are most definitely not.

It is believed that 'Trout' beans are an heirloom from Germany and prized for their ability to absorb flavors yet maintain their texture and shape. Each packet contains one ounce, which is approximately 45 seeds.

(19) Appaloosa

85 days — The plants can reach twenty four inches and have short runners. The seeds have one cream half and the other is maroon and mottled with various patterns - like the tail end of an Appaloosa horse. Can be used young as a snap bean but generally dried and shelled.

(20) Cranberry

70 days — An heirloom horticultural bean variety popular in New England dating back to the mid-1800s. The seeds are buff mottled with cranberry. Used dry or green shelled, there are five to six seeds per pod. The plants are hardy and they are easy to shell. The flavor is sweeter and more delicate than pinto beans. Popular for Italian, Spanish and Portuguese dishes. 

(21) Steuben Yellow Eye

(a.k.a. Molasses Face, Yellow Eyed China, Dot Eye)
90 days — Beautiful cream colored beans with a splash of yellow over the eye. Popular field bean in New England, the eighteen inch bush-type plants are hardy and prolific. Excellent for soup and baking.  According to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln…may very well be the Boston baking bean famous for years in the US. Pods are packed full with chubby cute white and golden/yellow brown beans when dried. 75-80 days

(22) Tongue of Fire

--70 days — Italian heirloom (Borlotti Lingua di Fuoco). A cranberry-type horticultural bean variety originally collected from Tierra del Fuego on the tip of South America.  Italian origin. Stringless pale green pods with red streaks. Crisp and juicy. Use young pods fresh or for shell beans.  The pods are ivory tan with red streaks and spots as they mature. The seeds are large and roundish. They have an excellent flavor and texture and are good fresh, canned, frozen or dried.

--The darling of Italian cooking, and one of the oldest borlotti bean varieites, the 'lingua di fuoco' (tongue of fire) bean is multi-purpose – stringless snap or a delicious shelling bean. The real beauty lies in keeping these lovelies for shelling. 14 cm long dangling jewels of red and yellow splashed pods contain 4-6 red flecked beans with a delicious creamy flavour. Give shelled beans a quick boil and lick of olive oil. Make an excellent dried bean if you have any leftover. Height 50-60cm.

 

These beans thrive in warmth. They love plenty of organic matter dug in and you will be rewarded with heavy cropping after several feeds once the flowers appear. Borlottis will be drought tolerant, but good watering after flowering will ensure best pod development.

(23) Mayacoba Canario

Mayacoba Canario has been cultivated by the people in Mexico and Central America for thousands of years.  There are several varieties of Mayacoba beans. Mayacoba Canario Bean is an heirloom dry shell bush variety known for its beautiful beans in shades of yellow with little to no distinctive eye. Our son Dante calls these his "Magic Golden Beans". The strong bush type plants produce large amounts of oval 5" - 6" long pods. Each Mayacoba Canario Bean pod is filled with 4 to 5 good sized, meaty thin skinned beans. In cooking, these beans will capture all the flavors and seasons you can put in the pot, but still hold its shape. Mayacoba Canario beans have a sweet, creamy texture and flavor. For fresh shell beans pick when beans are plump and beans formed, around 60 days. For dry beans, you can pick as above around 60 days to let dry indoors in or out of pod. Or leave pods on the plant until matured and dried down around 80 to 90 days.

(24) Zuni Shalako/Prairie Appaloosa

These heirloom beans are native to Southwestern United States and Mexico. These beautiful beans are sometimes called Prairie Appaloosa Bean because of their coloration. The name of the Zuni Shalako Bean: The Zuni Tribe grew these beans and used them in their winter ceremony where they were given to them by the Shalako Kachina. This is a bush type plant that stays under 2 feet tall but has a similar habit to Pinto beans sending up an occasional runner as any bean that wants more light will. The bush plants produce an abundant amount of pods containing small beans that average 1/4" wide and 3/8" long. Harvest Zuni Shalako early and cook as fresh snap or shell beans or let fully mature for a dry bean. Zuni Shalako Bean or Prairie Appaloosa Bean are perfect used as a dry bean in southwest dishes because of their ability to absorb flavors such as chile peppers. 50 days until harvest for green snap beans, 60 - 65 days until harvest for fresh beans, or 75 days until harvest for dry beans. Harvest as dry beans when the pod is dry and the bean can not easily be dented with your fingernail.

(25) Painted Pony

This heirloom is a bean is native to Mexico and the Southwestern United States.  Painted Pony Bean is a dual purpose bean.  It is a dry shell variety that can also be used as a snap bean, just pick it early, when the pods start to plump, as you would any snap bean.  The bush type plants of Painted Pony Beans are very good producers of long thin green stringless pods.  58 days until harvest for green snap beans.  80 days until harvest for dry beans.  For dry beans, Painted Pony Bean pods are ready to pick when they are mature and dried down.

(26) Dapple Gray

The heirloom beans from this variety are bright white with gray markings resembling the marking of a Dapple Gray Horse.  From a distance Dapple Gray Beans almost have a matte appearance or rawhide look to them, but as you get closer to them they have a bit of a shine.  This heirloom bush bean type plant grows to 18" tall and produces well.  Harvest early and cook fresh or let fully mature for a dry bean.  The Dapple Gray Bean has a really good texture.  As with many beans it changes color when cooked.  Tomato compliments its flavor, so it's well suited for a vegetarian chili.  55 days until harvest for fresh beans.
Harvest as dry beans when the pod is dry and the bean can not easily be dented with your fingernail.

(27) Jacob’s Gold

This beautiful bean is the product of a stabilized cross between the classic “Jacob’s Cattle” and “Paint”, stable since 1990. Early, large, and prolific it has found a lasting place in our dry bean collection. The mottled, speckled gold and white beans are about the size of pintos with a rich flavor and meaty texture perfect for hearty soups and chili.  Plants are very productive and the dried pods are easy to shell. Pods contain between 5 to 6 seeds per.80-90 days

(28) Rockwell

This may be the first commercial offering of this variety of dry bean in a seed catalogue ever. An heirloom from the Coupeville area of Central Whidbey Island in WA, it is named after the late 1800's pioneer Elisha Rockwell who brought it to the area. Though it never became a commercial crop, the bean has remained popular in homestead gardens for well over a century, renown for its ability to germinate in cool soil, mature early, and its outstanding flavor. The beans are creamy white with a mottled burgundy spot around the hilum and are great for most dishes but are especially known for making terrific baked beans. Our seed stock came from the folks at Willowood Farm in Coupeville who are working to popularize this local treasure. A first rate, productive dry bean for our maritime climate. Very rare.

(29) Ireland Creek Annie

An old English heirloom variety brought to Canada in the 1920s, it is said to be named after the Ireland Creek Farm in BC where it has been grown since the '30s.  Cool season tolerant, and very early maturing, it bears its long pods heavily on bush plants.  A VERY solid producer of buff yellow to mustard colored beans that cook down to deliciously rich, creamy texture.  Excellent for soups, sauces, and spreads.  Dry beans this reliable in northern maritime climates are  worth their weight in gold.  75 days.

(30) Lina Cisco’s Bird Egg

A family heirloom from one of the six original members of the Seed Savers Exchange (now the largest public participation heirloom seed initiative in the world).  These seeds are said to have been brought by Lina's grandmother to Missouri by covered wagon ing the 1880's.  Delicious smooth texture and rich flavor for soups or on their own. Bush horticultural type.  85 days.

(31) Flageolet Vert

The Flageolet, a close relative of the Hungarian rice bean, which was grown on private estates to feed the European nobility during the winter months, was introduced for the International Paris Exposition in 1878 by French gardener, Chevrier of Bretigny. The shelled beans can be eaten (and celebrated!) in their semi dry stage as a shelly bean, and when they are fully dry. The flageolet can also be consumed at the "green bean" stage, like some other "horticultural beans" although this is of short duration because the pod is not stringless (well, there may be one or two stringless cultivars).  Reserved, as William Woys Weaver so aptly states, for elegant and sophisticated cooking (think cassoulet, risotto...), flageolets are intensely creamy, hold their shape when cooked, and cook quickly. The plants themselves are compact and loaded with slender long green beans (8-10 seeds/pod) that remain a light green when fully dry as do the seeds themselves. As you may have sensed from my exuberant and lengthy description, these beans are a celebration unto themselves.  75-80 days. 

(32) Blue Jay

Bush/Snap. Blossom pink. 55-65 days to snap and 90 days dry. Discovered and named by Russ Crow in 1977. Found it among a growout of the white seeded 19th century French snap heirloom Comtesse de Chambord. Brought to commercial status in Canada by Bob Wildfong and Shirley Bellows of Seeds Of Diversity Canada. Sold by Andrea Berry's Hope Seeds & Perrenials, plus over 10 other Canadian seed companies. First listed in the SSE Yearbook from 1980 to '86.  Blue Jay is a nice early snap bean with good flavor. The green pods are produced in abundance and the dried seed is navy blue with beige streaks and can be used as a dry bean.  For full details, see
http://www.abeancollectorswindow.com/bluejay.html

Similar in appearance to Tendergeen Improved, only dark colors are more bluish/purplish. 

(33) Candy

Bush/106 Dry days. Very large red and white seeds that look a bit like peppermint candies. High yielding bush plants which send out a few runners.  Tasty and early.  Found in Russ Crow's garden in 1982, and named by him. Never listed it in the SSE yearbook himself, but sent seed to Ralph Stevenson (MI ST R) of Michigan in '84 from which it spread through SSE. The SSE yearbook history reads under MI ST R (from Russell Crow of Ill.), and Anne Fuller of Indiana IN FU A (a find from IL CR R). 

Details - Pole Beans and Runner Beans

(A) Painted Lady (Phaseolus coccineus)

Traditional English bi-color grown since 1596! The name refers to Queen Elizabeth I, "who was heavily made up with rouge and white chalk." The gorgeous flowers of red and white are among the most beautiful of flowering beans. The large beans are also good as snaps, freshly shelled or as dry beans, which are chocolate and tan mottled in color.

(B) Scarlet Runner (Phaseolus coccineus)

-- Among the most productive of all beans. This Native American heirloom bean grows on long healthy vines that reach over 10' tall.  This plant is an edible ornamental.  The vines are covered with clusters of Scarlet Red Flowers that attract large amounts of birds and butterflies. They can be used as a snap bean, shell bean or dry bean.  The green pods are edible whole but best when harvested at 4" - 8" as they tend to become fibrous as they mature.  The beans can be cooked fresh or as dried beans.  Cook beans thoroughly.  Scarlet Runner Beans are a purple rose colored with black mottling.  Flowers can be eaten fresh, added to salads they impart a beany flavor.  Can be a perennial plant as it grows differently than other bean varieties and produces a tuberous root.  The starchy roots can be prepared and eaten as you would Jerusalem Artichokes.  For dry beans, pods are ready to pick when they are mature and dried down. 

-- The Scarlet Runner Bean is native in highlands of Mexico, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. It has been cultivated there for thousands of years. By the 1600s it was being grown in England and the eastern United States. It is one of about three dozen species of Phaseolus, all New World natives. It is not among the most economically important species of beans.

(C) Blue Lake (Pole)

This heirloom bean is a pole type plant that bear heavy yields of dark green, round pods that measure up to six inches long.  They set beans from the base to the top of the vines.  Heirloom Blue Lake Pole Beans are stringless, tender and crisp with a good wholesome flavor.  The seeds are white.  Like the bush variety the Heirloom Blue Lake Pole Bean plants produce longer than many other beans. 64 Days until harvest. 

(D) Rattlesnake

--This pole bean is easy to grow and produces lots of green pods that have purple streaks. Good flavor and very tender; the speckled seeds are popular in soup. This variety is great for hot, humid areas.

--Rattlesnake Pole Bean.  This heirloom bean is a pole type plant that bear heavy yields of Flattened 7-in. pods that are streaked with green and purple resembling rattlesnake markings. The vines and beans will wrap around ther trellis or corn stalks like a snake. The beans are stringless, tender and crisp with a good wholesome flavor.  The seeds are mottled brown and light tan with black markings. Good variety for hot & humid areas but can grow in cool areas as well.  74 Days until harvest.

(E) Gold Marie Vining

70-75 days. Rampant vining plants produce tons of large golden pods. The gorgeous pods are ideal when harvested at 6-8 inches, but are often tender at much larger dimensions! The massive pods are a bright, clear buttercup yellow, flat and sometimes almost resemble a loose spiral shape, looking voluptuous hanging from the robust vines. This worthy variety was nearly lost commercially and was preserved by backyard seed savers.

(F) Scarlet Emperor (Phaseolus coccineus)

-- a stunning heirloom grown in America as early as 1750. Very vigorous and good producer with brilliant red flowers that become 6"-8" fat juicy, slightly fuzzy, richly flavored pods. The very large seeds are dusky pink with black mottling. Many grow this runner bean for its decorative value - and because it attracts hummingbirds in droves. If growing for culinary purposes, pick the pods very young and cook thoroughly to eliminate any toxins. 60-90 days.

--With such magnificent clusters of rich red flowers, this variety is predominantly used as a flowering screen, vine, or fence cover. Little known is that this runner bean has an extremely rich, sweet flavor when picked young; can be shelled for green or dried beans when pods mature.

--The original Scarlet Runner Bean has remained a perennial favorite for hundreds of years, but other similar cultivars exist. 'Scarlet Emperor' and 'Best of All' look nearly identical."

(G) Painted Lady Improved (Phaseolus coccineus)

(aka Bicolor Runner, Painted Runner) Described by Arrabida in Flora of Rio de Janeiro in 1827. Incredibly beautiful bi-colored blossoms are very attractive to hummingbird moths. This strain is less affected by warmer temperatures than other runner beans and is a prolific bloomer. Esteemed as both an ornamental and edible climber. Pole habit, 68 days.

(H) Sunset Runner (Phaseolus coccineus)

A flowering bean with unique salmon-pink blossoms; esteemed as a vegetable or as an ornamental climber. Produces abundant crops of flavorful beans throughout the season. Excellent for freezing. Pole habit, 60-65 days.  2013 purchases were organic.

(I) Eye of the Goat/Ojo de Cabra

Ojo de Cabra Bean Seed This heirloom is a dry shell variety that can also be used as a snap bean, just pick it early, when the pods start to plump, as you would any snap bean.  Plump, taupe colored beans with a distinctive "Goat Eye" stripe are sweet flavored and smooth textured.  Sturdy vines give good yields.  Harvest Eye Of The Goat Bean early and cook as fresh snap or shell beans, or let fully mature for a dry bean.  55 days until harvest for fresh beans.  Harvest as dry beans when the pod is dry and the bean can not easily be dented with your fingernail. 

(J) Aztec Cave Bean/New Mexico Cave Bean

(a.k.a. New Mexico Appaloosa Bean) Also known by some as “Anasazi” which is the trademarked name given by a milling company for this bean that has been cultivated by the people native to the present day Four Corner area of the United States for thousands of years.  This heirloom has quite a long story as to its history, that you can read below the description.  Aztec Cave Bean is a dry shell variety that can also be used as a snap bean, just pick it early, when the pods start to plump, as you would any snap bean.  The strong pole type plants produce large amounts of wide flattened 7" pods. The beans of Aztec Cave Bean have a sweet, creamy flavor.  For green snap beans harvest Aztec Cave Beans at approximately 50 days.  They are a string bean so be sure to remove the strings.  This requires a little work, but the flavor is worth it.  For dry beans, pods are ready to pick when they are mature and dried down.  90 days until full maturity.  These beans will easily cover a trellis.  When in bloom it looks like popcorn is popping out of the leaves.  The blooms start out a bright white and turn buttery yellow before they fall off.

Many seed resellers sell Jacob's Cattle Bean as Anasazi Bean.  This bean is NOT Jacob's Cattle or Trout Bean.  Jacob's Cattle Bean is a much larger bean, being nearly twice the size and the bean has splashes and small spots.  Anasazi Bean has large splashes.  Jacob's Cattle Bean is a bush plant.  The flavor is also different, less creamy, more hearty.

(K) Kentucky Wonder (Pole)

This bean was first marketed in 1864 as Texas Pole, then renamed and introduced in 1877 as Kentucky Wonder by James J. H. Gregory & Sons. Vigorous 5-7' plants yield clusters of 7-10" stringless pods. Great flavor, an all-time favorite. Pole habit, snap, 58-64 days.

(L) Purple Peacock

Canadian Heirloom.  Purple Peacock Pole Bean is a simply beautiful plant with dark purple pods, twining stems, light purple flowers, and dark leaves. This pretty variety is a very striking and useful screen in the garden and grows to 2m (6") tall. These beans flower first of all the bean varieites and handle cool conditions well. Purple pods to 13cm (5") long keep their flavour and tenderness long after they are picked, and turn green when cooked. Plants set abundantly. Seeds are beige. A very productive bean that is also quite early for a pole bean. 60-60 days for snaps.

(M) Cherokee Trail of Tears

(aka Cherokee Black) Given to SSE in 1977 by the late Dr. John Wyche, SSE member from Hugo, Oklahoma. Dr. Wyche’s Cherokee ancestors carried this bean over the Trail of Tears, the infamous winter death march from the Smoky Mountains to Oklahoma (1838-1839), leaving a trail of 4,000 graves. Green 6" pods with purple overlay, shiny jet-black seeds. Good for snap beans and dry beans. Pole habit, snap or dry, 85 days.  Stringless.

(N) Fortex

--Fortex is utterly delicious. The first bite is a revelation about how good a green bean can be. The crisp texture and sweet beanie taste are excellent. The beans are thin and curvaceous and may be harvested at any length from 6 - 11". The plants are vigorous and grow up to 10' tall. This is a bean variety of superior quality that deserves space in every garden. 60 days.

--70 days. An early and productive gourmet delight. The exceptionally long, medium-green pods grow to over 10 inches long. This stringless French pole bean can be harvested at 6-7 inches for extra slender filet beans. Scrumptious when fresh, the rich, sweet flavor is a welcome treat. Fine restaurant or specialty market farmers should grow this one. The 6 foot tall vigorous plants require trellising. Dark brown seeds. A, BV.